Thursday, 18 May 2017

CoL inquiry - LEARN checklist

During our first CoL meeting for Term 2 we were introduced to a new Inquiry Framework. It followed our Learn, Create, Share pedagogy and so I have made a summary page for the 'Learn' part and matched it up with my inquiry posts in Term 1. This is focussing the inquiry - "What is important? (and therefore worth spending time on) given where my students are at?"

As you can see, one of the areas I need to work on is 'Scan' - what outside factors are contributing to students not being able to retain number knowledge well in their heads.

This term, I will looking at the 'Share' part of our framework.

Gather evidence
Student achievement data eg. standardised tests, OTJs, internals and externals
Anecdotal evidence eg. observations, formative assessment tasks, student voice,  parent voice, previous teachers, surveys,  learning walks and reciprocal visits



Scan
Wider perspective on learning not just aspects that are easily measured eg considering perspectives of our young people and their whānau. How engaged are they with learning? Can they describe what they are learning and why it is important?  (AfL) Links to Key Competencies

Identify Trends
Looking at all the evidence, thinking hard about its “shape”. Noticing where there are cohort trends that extend out beyond the class, to the team or department, maybe even for this school across schools in the CoL
Clearly identifying the common learning challenges or problems.
Looking for and identifying strategies that are known to have the greatest impact on on this/these challenges


Hypothesise
Analysis and interpretation often take place in the mind of the teacher, who then uses the insights gained to shape their actions as they continue to work with their students. These theories for improvement should connect with the inquiries related to the Achievement Challenge of the Department/Team, the School and the CoL.
Research
“This involves asking questions about how well current strategies are working and whether others might be more successful. Teachers search their own and their colleagues’ past practice for strategies that may be more effective, and they also look in the research literature to see what has worked in other contexts.”

Reflect
“Inquiry into the teaching–learning relationship goes hand in hand with formative assessment, in the cyclical evaluation process that goes on moment by moment, day by day, and over the longer term.” Assessment-in-the-classroom/Teaching-as-inquiry

Wednesday, 17 May 2017

Weighting of OTJ's

As part of our school PD around mathematics, each team met with Jo Knox for further PD specific to their teams needs. Team 5 met with Jo on Tuesday afternoon and the first part of our session was clarification around OTJ's and how much weight each  of the different assessments and observations are when forming your OTJ's.

One of the main points that came out of this was: To meet the standard, a student needs to be working at that standard independently and most of the time.

One of the 'must have' documents you need to form an OTJ is the NZC Mathematics Standards Poster
Together with the Standards book and if need be, the NZ Maths books with illustrations.

Some of the questions we had as a team were around the weighting of assessments such as IKAN, GloSS, PAT and normal classroom/group observations - which do we put more emphasis or weight on when making our OTJ?
To clarify this for us, we took part in an activity practising how to make an OTJ based on some pieces of evidence she had gathered. 

We then circled which standard we thought the student best met based on the different data. From there we made an OTJ based on not just 1 piece of assessment, but several and always referring back to the NZC maths standards poster.

Of course you were not expected to do this for every single student in your class, but was a great way to moderate across the teachers of your year level and also the students who sat just on the edge of being either below/at or at/above the standard and needed a closer look at work samples.

There were so many clear and useful tips around number knowledge that I felt, even after 10+ years of teaching, served as a good reminder/ clarified some of my own misconceptions when making OTJ's. Here are a list of some points I found useful and hope they can be of use to you too.
  • Number knowledge is for facilitating problem solving
  • IKAN test is great for identifying how to support students with number knowledge to help them access more sophisticated strategies
  • Knowledge does not have to be a tick box 
  • Knowledge is never mentioned on its own in NZC poster - but HOW students are using knowledge to solve problems


  

Tuesday, 9 May 2017

Maths PD with Jo Knox - Part 2

Our series of PD's we've had with Jo Knox have been really useful in terms of content knowledge and also a reminder for all the things we need to consider when planning our maths lessons for our students.

One of the 'gems' I got out of the PD was the use of the IKAN test. Hearing from Jo that the 3 second rule was a bit unfair to measure students knowledge against put my mind at ease. Jo also shared how using the IKAN test papers after being marked was a useful activity. Getting students to revisit the questions they got wrong and quickly see why, and whether they need more help with it or it is something that can be corrected easily.

Here are some more highlights from our PD:

  • Mathemagic time! - Have a go!
  • Aligning NZ Number Framework, Curriculum and National Standards
  • Explaining formative and summative assessment using the garden analogy
  • Using a Spidergraph for GloSS and IKAN
Below are slides Jo Knox shared with our staff.
               

Friday, 5 May 2017

Number Knowledge vs Strategy

Last night was our first CoL meeting for Term 2. One of the highlights for me was listening to others share about their inquiries in our small groups. We were also given the opportunity to respond to prompting questions about our inquiries also received useful feedback from our colleagues. One of the prompts was 'What are possible next steps for planning my teaching inquiry?'. This has lead me to reflect on my Term 1 observations when my focus was mainly on teaching just number knowledge.

This lead me back to the NZ Maths Site. Delving into its numerous resources and research has helped me get a better understanding for what I need to target when teaching my priority students. In my haste to try and push for number knowledge I haven't adequately balanced the scales to account for the back and forth teaching of strategy too! Here is an excerpt from the online numeracy PD - Number framework.

So I will definitely be keeping this in the forefront of my mind when planning for my students. I was also reminded of some slides shared by Jo Knox in our first PD in Term 1.